More Monarchs on the Monocacy

 

In a field awash in purple and yellow and green, butterflies float between plumes of goldenrod and sturdy ironweed blossoms. Among the plain, white cabbage moths and big, brilliant swallowtails, are a few ever-popular Monarchs, whose recent population decline is of particular concern (see Monocacy Milkweed). On my way back from scavenging the banks of the Monocacy, I like to stop by the open fields and look under the leaves of the scattered milkweed plants, where the distinctly striped caterpillars of the Monarch are likely to be. Yesterday I found a pair of the wee larvae munching away. As it is early September, these caterpillars, if they survive to butterfly-hood, are of the generation that will make the famous flight to Mexico. That’s a big future for such a little insect. But I’m rooting for them!

2 thoughts on “More Monarchs on the Monocacy

  1. May those caterpillars live long and prosper. It’s sad that monarch numbers are declining in their home territories. We have monarchs here in New Zealand – they’re not native to the country, so may have been blown across the Tasman from Australia. Many people grow milkweed in their gardens for them. Don’t ask me where they spend the winter, but it’s not likely to be Mexico.

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